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Noah Simblist is an artist and writer based in Dallas and Austin. He has written for ART LIES and Art Papers magazines as well as web based publications such as Cablegram, Glasstire, Zerodegreesart and ...might be good. He is an Associate Professor of Art at SMU and is currently pursuing a PhD in art history at the University of TX, Austin.

Rachel Whiteread and the Piety of Modernism

Whiteread’s is a post-minimal approach, drawing on abstract histories but eliminating the binary opposition of representation and abstraction. This freedom is what disassociates Whiteread’s work from the dogma of modernism. It is her ability to be impure, combining the abstract and the real, the abject with the refined and fine art with design that make this work progressive and refreshing. But this progress is stifled when the piety of modernism creeps in. When these objects are treated as relics to be housed in the reliquary of the museum it robs them of their openness.

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Ben Jones’ Sculpture, Video, and Paintings Create Tension Between the Real and Imagined

Donkey Kong is for my generation what the madeleine was for Proust. The bright colors, jumpy video, and pixilation of 1980’s video games are so specific that one glimpse can provoke waves of nostalgia. Today of course this aesthetic is quaint and even primitive compared to the fine line that exists between the real and the virtual with Halo and Avatar.

But just as modernist artists like Picasso and Dubuffet looked to the “primitive” for greater purities of expression, a generation of artists have been mining the aesthetics of retro-technology to step out of the mad rush to the future.

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A Change of Scenery Redefines a Familiar Collection of Sculpture

Taking architecture as a starting point, Christina Rees and Thomas Fuelmer have curated a stunning show of work from a Dallas collection that is usually seen in the sleek white confines of a home designed by Richard Meier. The exhibition, entitled Floor Corner Wall: Selected Work from the Rachofsky Collection at Fort Worth Contemporary Arts […]

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