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Meadows Museum Snags Significant Acquisition with New Painting By Goya

The Meadows Museum, the SMU-housed institution dedicated to the art of Spain, announced that it has acquired a new work by Goya. The painting, entitled Portrait of Mariano Goya, the Artist’s Grandson, is a portrait of Goya’s grandson. Significantly, it was completely in the last months of the artist’s life, making it one of the last pieces by the seminal Spanish painter. From the release:

The work — which has not been on display for more than 40 years — is from the pivotal last phase of Francisco Goya’s career, finished just months before his death, and marks an important bridge between Old Masters and modern painting: Portrait of Mariano Goya, the Artist’s Grandson demonstrates how seminal Goya is to this critical moment in the history of art. The Meadows’ collection includes five other Goya paintings and complete, first-edition sets of all of his major print series and this new acquisition will enable the museum to thoroughly contextualize those works for both research and exhibition purposes.

The painting will be unveiled at the museum at a media event this Friday. That means DFW will get two new notable works of art this Friday, Oct 11.

goyafull

One comment on “Meadows Museum Snags Significant Acquisition with New Painting By Goya

  1. October 13, 2013

    Re: “The Meadows’ collection includes five other Goya paintings and complete, first-edition sets of all of his major print series and this new acquisition will enable the museum to thoroughly contextualize those works for both research and exhibition purposes.”

    With exception of some 485 lifetime proofs, Goya’s “Disasters of War” were -never- editioned.

    So, what the Meadow Museum has, in their collection, most likely is some 80 non-disclosed posthumous [1863 of later] forgeries from posthumously [1863 or later] reworked and altered plates by the Royal Academy that have been falsely attributed as “Disaster of War” etchings to a dead Francisco de Goya y Lucientes.

    Goya died in 1828. The dead don’t etch.

    Then to add insult to injury, Goya’s “Disparates” series of etching plates were -never- printed during his lifetime. So, at best, they would be posthumous impressions, not original works of visual art ie., etchings attributable to a dead Goya. Unfortunately, to go from the ridiculous to the extreme, when one compares Goya’s preliminary light and airy drawings to these posthumous impressions, one can’t help but notice the addition of dark aquatint everywhere on the plates.

    So, are we to suspend disbelief or just believe, if the Royal Academy posthumously [1863 or later] altered Goya’s “Disasters of War” plates with aquatint, lines and titles to fit the sensibilites of mid-nineteenth-century, that they did not posthumously [1864 or later] do the same to Goya’s “Disparates” etching plates.

    The Royal Academy, in 1863 and 1864 or later, seem to have no shame.

    Caveat Emptor!

    Gary Arseneau
    artist, creator of original lithographs & scholar
    Fernandina Beach, Florida