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Rounding out the weekend's goings-on: a can't-miss Friday night at Rubber Gloves, Mount Righteous returns, Hailey's hosts a solid hip hop lineup, Home by Hovercraft, Alejandro Escovedo, and more.

Weekender: Dallas Area Concerts for Feb 28-March 2

THURSDAY

“Stereo on Strike” (Zubar): Tonight’s guests include Red Eye and R9, along with the usual appearance from Blixaboy. These sets focus heavily on techno, and not of the blog-oriented variety, so it’s recommended that you discard the expectations one might have from these oft-seen names.

Also at Zubar tonight: Whoa, and Track Meet is also in the building tonight, which is giving Greenville Ave its first real stab at competing with the popularity of Thursdays on Hendy in a long time. I won’t pick sides, but I’m thrilled to see some real activity on Greenville again.

Dagoberto Gilb with Felix Flores Band (Bishop Arts Theater): Wordspace is hosting this evening’s event, featuring celebrated Southwest author Dagoberto Gilb, whose list of awards, accomplishments, and fellowships eat up most of his bio. Luckily City Council Member Delia Jasso and artist Celia Alavarez Muñoz will be on hand to sort it all out.

To understand why both an artist and a politician would host Gilb, it helps to understand his unique place in polarized modern America. And specifically in the classroom, where the writer has had two books banned by default, when the Mexican American Studies Department was shut down in the Tucson Unified School District. Those would be The Magic of Blood, and Woodcuts of Women, and here’s an excerpt from Gilb’s response following the ban, where he calls it out for exactly what it is:

Of course this banning is raw, ugly racism. But may I suggest that it’s good it’s out in the open and publicly displayed? And with this we teach metaphor:  our literature has always been put away, carted to storage. What’s new is that books got out, to ambitious, bright young people no less, and now has been confiscated. Doesn’t that sort of describe the Mexican American experience for the last 200 years? We’re not treated as if we’re from here, that we have our history here, that our land and history is part of the country’s land and history.

To read the rest of Gilb’s blistering response, go here. For reservations, call: 214-838-3554

Update: This Will Destroy You/Carlo Canlas (Dan’s Silver Leaf): Presented by We Denton Do It, who just had an overhaul of their already slick and clean website. It is now cleaner and slicker.

 

FRIDAY

Eyes, Wings, and Many Other Things/Midnite Society/Diamond Age/Juve (Rubber Gloves Rehearsal Studios): They should just call this show, “Some of the Only Artists Left in the Area Who Never Embarrass Us or Themselves.”  But they won’t, so I am.

Mount Righteous/Fox and the Bird/Michael Donner (Double Wide): Mount Righteous was once DFW’s best response to the national music scene, a band that invertedly celebrated the suburbs through a kind of Tim Burton directs The Music Man aesthetic. They were a visual spectacle, a mass of humanity framed by an undulating sousaphone and marching bass drum, and they had the talent to match. Consequently, I was disappointed by the band’s disappearance in 2010. Their break lasted two years to the month, November 2010 to November 2012. Bandleader Joey Kendall says that’s part of the plan. “[Mount Righteous] is a lifetime project, so an occasional hiatus is inevitable,” says Kendall. Mount Righteous returns with an altered lineup, losing the sousaphone and gaining an electric bass and ukulele. The personnel changes, like the hiatuses, are a natural consequence of a musical group with so many moving parts. And while he might be tempted to think about the next album or the next tour, Joey Kendall is keeping his view deliberately shortsighted. “Our immediate goal is to play well for our Dallas fans on Friday.”

Mount Righteous will be joined by The Fox and the Bird, who have been playing at a pretty decent clip since last October and are gearing up for a run of ancillary SXSW performances. The Fox and the Bird have undergone their own musician swaps over the past few years, but unsung virtuoso Petra Kelley has long been installed on violin and that alone is worth the price admission. —Dick Sullivan

A.Dd+/Josh Rand/Yeahdef/Ant the MC/MacBroadz/Work’N Progress and Definition Dancers (Hailey’s Club): Aside from A.Dd+, the lineup that you see listed is being billed as the “DiveHiFlyLo Experience,” so it is assumed that if it is not directly related to A.Dd+, it is at least endorsed by association. The group has become so popular that ten bucks is a pretty good deal to see them, and especially in Denton, where Dallas-ites still act like they need a passport to travel. One of my non-rap fan colleagues even likes A.Dd+, so it’s no wonder that the group does so well. Work’N Progress is a joint-effort between TWU and UNT and we wholeheartedly endorse that highbrow/lowbrow aesthetic, as you may have heard before.

“Night Comfort” (Texas Theatre): This is an event which could use some more awareness, and it features one of my personal favorite DJs, Tommyboy, playing music videos throughout the evening. Tommyboy has a strong grasp of both the familiar and the impossibly obscure, so this is recommended.

SATURDAY

Home by Hovercraft/Dataholwer/Bethan (Club Dada): Datahowler once dedicated the track “H8 YR FACE THNKS K BYE” to me on Twitter. Oddly enough it was one of the more mature things ever sent to me on that platform.

Year of the Bear/Nervous Curtains/Wirewings (New Media Recordings): I tried so hard to see Year of the Bear in Fort Worth last Sunday, at the Wherehouse show where they were to perform to celebrate the release of “Group Therapy Vol. 1.” The show was so far behind that there were still three bands left to play at midnight, which is actually pretty common for shows at off-brand venues. It was still a good time, but I hope to see them soon, since I tipped off that they were one of the better groups from out of that city lately.

Alejandro Escovedo (The Kessler): More info here.

 

 

 

Image: Mount Righteous performing at 35 Denton, in 2010. Photo by Andi Harman.